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W H O W H A T & W H Y H O W
Who
Who's being consulted? Who else is involved? Read more below...
What & Why
Click on this folder for more about the consultation and why it's being done.
How
Click on this folder for more on how to use this site to take part in the consultation.

This consultation is aimed at young people living in Scotland who are aged 11 to 18. Young people can take part in a variety of ways and you can find more under the How section. The main website for the Youth Summit also tells you more. The people organising it come from a number of organisations that work with young people. These organisations are listed below, along with links to other web sites that tell you more about them.

The Scottish Executive is the main body that carries out the wishes of the Scottish Parliament. The Minister for Children and Education, Sam Galbraith MSP, set the ball rolling by calling for this consultation. To find out more about the Scottish Parliament, you could begin by checking out how the parliament works on their website . You could also look at the Scottish Executiveís own site, but remember to come back here!

Children in Scotland is a national agency for voluntary, statutory and professional organisations and individuals working with children and their families in Scotland.

Community Learning Scotland is the national community education agency. It provides a focus and source of advice to the Government on community learning in general, and its Youth Issues Unit looks at youth issues in particular. It was launched in 1999 and used to be known as the Scottish Community Education Council (SCEC).

The International Teledemocracy Centre is a research centre within Napier University interested in the use of information and communication technology to support the democratic process. This is their website and they are running this e-consultation.

Save the Children (SCF) is the leading UK international children's rights organisation which works in 70 countries round the world. Here in Scotland, Save the Children seeks to ensure that children and young people have the opportunity to be fully consulted on the decisions that affect them in their everyday lives.

SCCC, the Scottish Consultative Council on the Curriculum helps to work out what should get taught in schools. It works with teachers, schools, education authorities and others to improve the quality of the learning experience for all young people.

Who Cares? Scotland is a friendly and welcoming organisation that works towards improving the standard of life for all young people in care in Scotland.

Young Scot provides a very informative newspaper and website for young people.

Youthlink Scotland supports and promotes the work and the common aims of voluntary youth organisations in Scotland in the interests of young people.

The Youth Summit in Motherwell on 19 June is being hosted by North Lanarkshire Council. That event and the regional conferences are being supported by all Scottish local authorities. The organising committee includes representatives of local authority community education and community services departments and of the professional associations to which their managers belong. Also involved in the organising team is COSLA the body that links together local councils in Scotland.

W H O W H A T & W H Y H O W
Who
Click on this folder for more on who's involved, OR to get back to the top
What & Why
What's this consultation about and why is it being done? Read more below...
How
Click on this folder for more on how to use this site to take part in the consultation.

The consultation aims to find out two things. Firstly how young people want to be consulted. Secondly, what issues they want to be consulted about. Why? One reason is that the Scottish Executive wants to try out new ways of involving young people. Also, to put in place an Action Programme for Youth the politicians need to know what kinds of action they should take. People canít vote in elections until they are 18 years old, so politicians need other ways to find out what your concerns are. Our job at the International Teledemocracy Centre is to find out whether this web site is a good way for you to tell others about the issues that concern you, and to vote on which of them are most important to young people in Scotland.
















W H O W H A T & W H Y H O W
Who
Click on this folder for more on who's involved, OR to get back to the top
What & Why
Click on this folder for more about the consultation and why it's being done.
How
How can you take part in the consultation using this web site? Read more below...

There are two main ways in which 11-18 year-olds can take part in this consultation. The first is to use this web site. We tell you how below. The second is the Scottish Youth Summit in Motherwell on 19 June. On that day there will also be live video links to "regional satellite conferences", and on-line discussion groups. You can find more details of these on the main web site.

How do I use this website to take part?

There are two ways. On the top left of the screen you can see links to the comments page and the votes page. You donít have to post comments to vote, but you will have a better idea of what youíre voting for!

The comment page

Here you will see a list of the top 20 issues of about 500 young people aged 11-18 who gave their views to teachers and youth groups, and took part in a survey in Young Scot newspaper in March 2000. To see more about a particular issue just click on its name. This will take you to a page on that issue. If you want to go back to the main comments page you can click on "<< Show all issues " at the top of the screen.

For each issue you will see any comments that have already been made and an opinion poll chart showing how important others think this issue is. You can add your own rating.

To see the full text of a comment on an issue just click on it. You can add your own comment by clicking on "post your own comment". This will bring up a postcard, click in the "What do you want to say?" box and type what you want. When you are finished and have typed in your name, just click the "stamp". Please note, you are free to criticise whoever or whatever you want, but we reserve the right to rule comments "out of order" if they use swearing, are libellous (saying things about people that can't be justified), or are prejudiced against sections of the community.

The vote page

This is where to make your opinion count! Here you can see the same issues as you can see in the comment pages. This time we ask you to choose up to 10 that you think are very important. You can choose fewer than 10, but no more than that.

We also ask for your name, your gender (male or female), age, and where you come from. This is only so we can get an overall picture of who we are getting votes from. Your name together with these details will not be published on the web site or anywhere else.

How will the results be used?

The input you give here will act to inform the both the organisers of the Youth Summit 2000 and also those young people attending the summit.

 
       

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